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Aisha Sobey

Aisha Sobey

PhD student

Lee Kuan Yew Scholar, Fitzwilliam College

Supervisor: Dr Emily So


Biography:

I am currently studying for a PhD in Architecture, with a focus on smart cities as the intersection of technology, society and power. I will be focussing on Singapore, as the world leading Smart Nation, and their approach the 'Smart' transformation and the impact this is having on the lives of those in the lowest socio-economic bands. I hope to understand the possible changes to the way we live in the advent of technology and the data influx we are experiencing. This includes the implications for equality, opportunity, privacy, human rights and quality of life. 

My background lies in politics and the loci of power within structural systems. I originally read PPE at Queens University Belfast, graduating in 2016. My dissertation "Opening Pandora’s Box: An evaluation of Central Bank Independence in light of the Review of the Bank of England’s Mandate" followed from an internship at the Bank of England, and looked at structural power in the central banking system.

While I worked under the British Councils generation UK scholarship programme to intern in China, I spent time with an NGO who aimed to implement social change through arts and culture, where the importance of cyberspace as a medium of both expression and control became apparent. The intersection of technology and society captured my interest, which lead into an MPhil in the department of Politics in Cambridge, considering the implications of US power with the advent of cyberspace and a thesis titled "A structural analysis of the relationship between cyberspace and US authority."

My current focus on Singapore and Smart technology is the extension of this to also include physical systems. If you have any input on this please do get in touch. 

Research Interests

Smart Cities

Technology and Society 

Structural Inequalities

Power

Singapore

Key Publications

http://www.cuspe.org/blockchain-policy-inertia-wheres-the-disruption/